On December 18th, a ceremony was held to celebrate the laying of the foundation stone for the new Rosh Tzippor bird-watching center to be established in the forest with the support of the Besen Family Foundation and Friends of JNF Australia. Among those present were KKL-JNF officials, the Mayor of Tel Aviv, the Australian Ambassador to Israel and relatives of the donors.

For Tel Aviv residents who want to enjoy an excursion in natural surroundings close to home, Rosh Tzippor Park is the perfect venue. Situated in the city’s Yarkon Park, this site is a paradise for nature lovers.

“Residents of central Israel deserve to have a green area that will be accessible to everyone. The bird-watching center will add another natural gem to Yarkon Park,” said KKL-JNF World Chairman Efi Stenzler at the ceremony. In his speech he recalled the task that JNF Australia had taken upon themselves in the wake of the Maccabiah disaster: to work for the rehabilitation of the Yarkon River. “In those most difficult times the community displayed exceptional generosity of spirit,” said the world chairman.

KKL-JNF began to plant the Rosh Tzippor (Hebrew for bird’s head) Forest in the 1950s, and work still continues there today. The first trees to be planted were eucalypti, themselves natives of Australia. In recent years, however, local varieties such as Tabor oak, Judas trees and two species of mastic tree have been added to the mix.

Aerial map of Rosh Tzippor, which looks like a bird’s head. Photo: Yoav Devir
The forest has dense undergrowth and it is home to a variety of songbirds and waterfowl. These, however, are not the source of its name, which derives instead from the shape of the forest: when viewed from the air it has the appearance of a bird’s head with an eye in the appropriate spot.

Tel Aviv Mayor Ron Huldai, a former pilot and commander in the Israeli Air Force, is probably long familiar with the landscape of the park as seen from above. In his present capacity as mayor, he is well aware of the park’s special importance to the residents of his city. “This park is a miracle, a green oasis surrounded by fast highways and urban development,” he told those present at the ceremony.

The mayor added that the site is one of the most frequently visited in the country. And, indeed, on a weekday morning the park is thronged with people: cyclists, joggers, groups of schoolchildren, courting couples and parents with baby buggies.

The park is crisscrossed by a number of walking routes, cycle paths and jogging trails. The easier footpaths are suitable for family outings and accessible to people with disabilities; children will enjoy the zip lines, rope bridges, roundabouts, seesaws and wooden climbing equipment in the adventure playground.

Other places to visit in Rosh Tzippor Forest include the historic Seven Mills (Sheva Tahanot) site, where water mills constructed along the banks of the Yarkon River in the 19th century remained in use until around a hundred years ago. On Napoleon Hill the remains of settlements dating back thousands of years can be seen.On December 18th, a ceremony was held to celebrate the laying of the foundation stone for the new Rosh Tzippor bird-watching center to be established in the forest with the support of the Besen Family Foundation and Friends of JNF Australia. Among those present were KKL-JNF officials, the Mayor of Tel Aviv, the Australian Ambassador to Israel and relatives of the donors.

For Tel Aviv residents who want to enjoy an excursion in natural surroundings close to home, Rosh Tzippor Park is the perfect venue. Situated in the city’s Yarkon Park, this site is a paradise for nature lovers.

“Residents of central Israel deserve to have a green area that will be accessible to everyone. The bird-watching center will add another natural gem to Yarkon Park,” said KKL-JNF World Chairman Efi Stenzler at the ceremony. In his speech he recalled the task that JNF Australia had taken upon themselves in the wake of the Maccabiah disaster: to work for the rehabilitation of the Yarkon River. “In those most difficult times the community displayed exceptional generosity of spirit,” said the world chairman.

KKL-JNF began to plant the Rosh Tzippor (Hebrew for bird’s head) Forest in the 1950s, and work still continues there today. The first trees to be planted were eucalypti, themselves natives of Australia. In recent years, however, local varieties such as Tabor oak, Judas trees and two species of mastic tree have been added to the mix.

Aerial map of Rosh Tzippor, which looks like a bird’s head. Photo: Yoav Devir
The forest has dense undergrowth and it is home to a variety of songbirds and waterfowl. These, however, are not the source of its name, which derives instead from the shape of the forest: when viewed from the air it has the appearance of a bird’s head with an eye in the appropriate spot.

Tel Aviv Mayor Ron Huldai, a former pilot and commander in the Israeli Air Force, is probably long familiar with the landscape of the park as seen from above. In his present capacity as mayor, he is well aware of the park’s special importance to the residents of his city. “This park is a miracle, a green oasis surrounded by fast highways and urban development,” he told those present at the ceremony.

The mayor added that the site is one of the most frequently visited in the country. And, indeed, on a weekday morning the park is thronged with people: cyclists, joggers, groups of schoolchildren, courting couples and parents with baby buggies.

The park is crisscrossed by a number of walking routes, cycle paths and jogging trails. The easier footpaths are suitable for family outings and accessible to people with disabilities; children will enjoy the zip lines, rope bridges, roundabouts, seesaws and wooden climbing equipment in the adventure playground.

Other places to visit in Rosh Tzippor Forest include the historic Seven Mills (Sheva Tahanot) site, where water mills constructed along the banks of the Yarkon River in the 19th century remained in use until around a hundred years ago. On Napoleon Hill the remains of settlements dating back thousands of years can be seen.